How does the brain process speech? We now know the answer, and it’s fascinating

Neuroscientists have known that speech is processed in the auditory cortex for some time, along with some curious activity within the motor cortex. How this last cortex is involved though, has been something of a mystery, until now. A new study by two NYU scientists reveals one of the last holdouts to a process of discovery which started over a century and a half ago. In 1861, French neurologist Pierre Paul Broca identified what would come to be known as “Broca’s area.” This is a region in the posterior inferior frontal gyrus.

This area is responsible for processing and comprehending speech, as well as producing it. Interestingly, a fellow scientist, whom Broca had to operate on, was post-op missing Broca’s area entirely. Yet, he was still able to speak. He couldn’t initially make complex sentences, however, but in time regained all speaking abilities. This meant another region had pitched in, and a certain amount of neuroplasticity was involved.

In 1871, German neurologist Carl Wernicke discovered another area responsible for processing speech through hearing, this time in the superior posterior temporal lobe. It’s now called Wernicke’s area. The model was updated in 1965 by the eminent behavioral neurologist, Norman Geschwind. The updated map of the brain is known as the Wernicke-Geschwind model.

Wernicke and Broca gained their knowledge through studying patients with damage to certain parts of the brain. In the 20th century, electrical brain stimulation began to give us an even greater understanding of the brain’s inner workings. Patients undergoing brain surgery in the mid-century were given weak electrical brain stimulation. The current allowed surgeons to avoid damaging critically important areas. But it also gave them more insight into what areas controlled what functions.

With the advent of the fMRI and other scanning technology, we were able to look at the activity in regions of the brain and how language travels across them. We now know that impulses associated with language go between Boca’s and Wernicke’s areas. Communication between the two help us understand grammar, how words sound, and their meaning. Another region, the fusiform gyrus, helps us classify words.

Read more: Big Think

By | 2018-06-03T15:22:41+00:00 June 3rd, 2018|Language, Neuroscience, Speech, The brain|0 Comments

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